Sunday, February 28, 2016

Dogs, wolves, and the fig leaf

Āngīrasa Śreṣtha ‏@GhorAngirasa 4h 4 hours ago Some are confusing alternative versions of myths found in purAnas with jnu mahishAsura martyrdom nonsense. Āngīrasa Śreṣtha ‏@GhorAngirasa Feb 25 Question for Hindus: Why do we always rely on spoonfed info instead of doing our own homework? ... "whatever makes me feel emotionally good must be the true theory"

50 years ago, everyone was parroting wheeler's AIT theory. Theories can be wrong but they can, nevertheless, be still based on certain facts. Then 10 years ago (obviously rough dates, not meant to be specific), every Hindu got "enlightened". Condemned wheeler, muller (that's fine) and condemned genetics and linguistics in toto as well (not fine at all). Started supporting OIT instead because some frawley/talageri/gautier/kazanas (whose hearts i dont deny being in the right place) said so. What is astounding is educated Hindus will never bother 2 read these works (at least the abstract of the paper) and make their own judgments. Instead the judgments must be ready-made for them and how do they decide which one to pick? "whatever makes me feel emotionally good must be the true theory"

How the fuck is such an attitude conducive for a scientific appreciation of such complex issues? And you know what is the most amazing thing about these Hindus? They dont just inherit the particular thought process of their favorite writers. But also the associated gamut of emotions that come with it. You see these H shouting "AIT is so bad. It means our religion was imported"

Because that's exactly what OIT proponents, etc have been saying. And they mimic those exact sentiments without processing them on their own. Because that's exactly what OIT proponents, etc have been saying. And they mimic those exact sentiments without processing them on their own. 2. Are the Aryas/Indo-Europeans really the "bad guys" who "oppressed Dravidians"? Well if you read Spencer Wells' The Journey of Man. You find that the M20 marker (@ high freq among Dravidian-speaking castes) entered India via the northwest; the same route as suspected of +the Aryas. The Dravidians themselves had displaced the coastal migrants (the tribals) with tribal men found lacking M20 haplogroup

What does this all mean? Simply put, the human story is one of endless displacements and migrations. No one notes how the coastal tribes (a remnant of them found in the Onge peoples of Andaman) were almost wholly displaced; but the so-called "Brutal Aryan invasion" hardly affected Dravidian languages the way Dravidian entry had impacted coastal migrants. Instead Dravidian languages have thrived. Also, with regards to the "imported religion" argument, while vedic hinduism may have cousins in the Indo-European world, the overwhelming bulk of the Vedic religion did develop in India. Hence if one patiently thinks about it, one realizes there is nothing to fret about in a theory of external entry of IE peoples into India. 

Āngīrasa Śreṣtha ‏@GhorAngirasa Feb 26 "history does not determine identity. The fact that dogs evolved from wolves does not mean that dogs are wolves." From a Judgement. Vedic culture's evolutionary descent from a Proto-Indo-European culture or west-eurasian genetic contributions does not at all negate the "Indic" or bhAratiya status of our heritage. It did. And the binding thread of the national fabric was Dharma. It is apparent the castes, sects and schools viewed themselves as part of a world where this diverse plethora existed. coexist in a framework with mutual recognition, exerting their supreme validity in their own respective domains

The common vocabulary, with sanskritic memes found even among tribes. These common usages and accumulated history of mutual interactions can be argued to represent a framework (or "habitat" you may call it) which we can safely call Dharma in a more universal sense

Āngīrasa Śreṣtha ‏@GhorAngirasa Feb 25 - @i_contemplate_ There is no logical link between AIT/PIE concepts and foreignness of what we call "Hindu Dharma". Zero. And there is no reason why this particular migration should be treated as intrinsically evil. Dravidians are migrants too; displaced coastal migrants. But nobody attaches emotional value to that. Spencer suggests that coastal migrants(Africa-->southern coast of bhArata, SEasia)may themselves have killed off Denisovans. It was a chain of brutal displacement. On the contrary, the Aryan entry left Dravidian languages and culture intact!! It was a chain of brutal displacement. On the contrary, the Aryan entry left Dravidian languages and culture intact!!
Āngīrasa Śreṣtha ‏@GhorAngirasa Feb 26 - @kkdr611 I did state that the overwhelming bulk of the Vedic religion did develop in India. @i_contemplate_
I am not an Abrahamic or some marxist retard. So stop treating me as an enemy. Approach everything in life with clinical objectivity. And I did acknowledge that talageri has his heart in the right place. But just because his theory makes Hindus feel good, it doesn't mean his work shouldn't be critiqued. When we say "Homeland", it is possible that we are talking about a time when writing had not yet come into play

He worships Talageri's Final Evidence book as bible. Contrast the abrahamic urge for a perfect, final revelation with the heathen culture of renewing philosophical, ritual models. The Abrahamic need for infallible, final book has been planted deeply in Hindus. Even in vedanta, we see that successive philosophers from Advaita school kept building up shankara's work. Even Shankara's own disciple, sUreshvarAchArya diasgreed with shankara on issues of who can take sannyAsa

This attempt by the ‘Outsiders’ to hijack the narrative about India and Hinduism from its indigenous practitioners and then project their own biasness and superimpositions as ‘Objective’ and ‘Authentic’ interpretation of Hinduism is at the heart of the debate raised by Rajiv Malhotra in his book. This insider vs. outsider, technically referred as ‘emic’ vs. ‘etic’, debate is not a new development. This could be traced back to at least the second half of the 18th century, when the British Orientalism started.

The Western narrative about Indian history, culture, and religion has become mainstream in Western and Indian Academia. Even those, who are otherwise neutral in their political outlook, tend to adhere to Western narratives regarding Hinduism, or at least use the western ‘rational’ lens to analyze Hindu culture and society.

Many people like Swami Vivekananda, Sri Aurobindo, Swami Dayananda Saraswati, etc. had effectively countered the Colonial narratives on Hinduism. In recent times, many people like Ram Swarup, Sita Ram Goel, Subhask Kak, Rajiv Malhotra, David Frawley, Nicholas Kazanas, etc. have countered the mainstream misrepresentations of India and Hinduism. But, many of these attempts at creating a Swadeshi Indology have been scattered, and from people who are mostly outside the Academia, with an exception of few like Professor S. N. Balagangadhara.

In The Invasion that Never Was (2000), he criticized the "Aryan invasion theory" and its proponents, instead opting for the notion of "Indigenous Aryans". Danino ...

The fig leaf is gone, revealing the BJP's naked Hindutva. My column in @bsindia today. http://www.business-standard.com/article/opinion/mitali-saran-there-goes-the-fig-leaf-116022600342_1.html …

[To push Hindutva, you essentially have to kick the Indian Constitution in the face. ~Mitali Saran @mitalisaran] http://marketime.blogspot.in/2016/02/k-sankaran-beloo-mehra-and-mitali-saran.html …


@gchikermane @peterheehs @UshyMohanDas [Luhmann: society consists not of actual people ... but rather communication] https://systemstheorysite.wordpress.com/2016/02/26/a-theory-of-society/ …

www.sasbangalore.org "The most important thing for an individual is to unify himself around his divine centre; in that way he becomes a true individual, master of himself and his destiny.

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